Welcome to where I am, where my kitchen's always messy, a pot's (or a poet) always about to boil over, a dog is always begging to be fed. Drafts of poems on the counter. Windows filled with leaves. Wind. Clouds moving over the mountains. If you like poetry, books, and music--especially dog howls when a siren unwinds down the hill-- you'll like it here.


MY NEW AUTHOR'S SITE, KATHRYNSTRIPLINGBYER.COM, THAT I MYSELF SET UP THROUGH WEEBLY.COM, IS NOW UP. I HAD FUN CREATING THIS SITE AND WOULD RECOMMEND WEEBLY.COM TO ANYONE INTERESTED IN SETTING UP A WEBSITE. I INVITE YOU TO VISIT MY NEW SITE TO KEEP UP WITH EVENTS RELATED TO MY NEW BOOK.


MY NC POET LAUREATE BLOG, MY LAUREATE'S LASSO, WILL REMAIN UP AS AN ARCHIVE OF NC POETS, GRADES K-INFINITY! I INVITE YOU TO VISIT WHEN YOU FEEL THE NEED TO READ SOME GOOD POEMS.

VISIT MY NEW BLOG, MOUNTAIN WOMAN, WHERE YOU WILL FIND UPDATES ON WHAT'S HAPPENING IN MY KITCHEN, IN THE ENVIRONMENT, IN MY IMAGINATION, IN MY GARDEN, AND AMONG MY MOUNTAIN WOMEN FRIENDS.




Showing posts with label NC. Show all posts
Showing posts with label NC. Show all posts

Saturday, October 23, 2010

NC STUDENT LAUREATE AWARDS FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL: LINDSEY DODGE, CAITLIN PARRIS, AND ABRIANNA BERRY

Macon Middle School in Franklin, NC, swept the Middle School category in our third annual NC English Teachers Association Student Poet Laureate Awards, judged by Cathy Smith Bowers, our state Poet Laureate. They are receiving their awards today at the annual conference held at Wake Forest University. Falecia Metcalf was our Second Prize winner last year. Addie Fairchild has been among the winners of the Mount Jefferson State Park's annual poetry contests. Congratulations to these five young poets!




Abrianna Berry, Caitlin Parris, and Lindsey Dodge, Macon County Middle School








First Prize: TIE


Everything




Everything is the same
Her clothes still hang in the closet
Pictures sit there gathering dust
There's still her place on their bed
Pawpaw doesn't disturb


by Lindsey Dodge, Macon Middle School, Franklin, NC




Kathy


I loved to watch her
in her big sun hat,
wiping the sweat
from her face,
kneeling on the ground
like she was praying.


The flowers she planted
were the most beautiful things
I have ever seen.


When she watered them,
the water would dance across them,
the sun shining over them.




Caitlin Parris
Macon Middle School








Second:


Squirrel Hunting With My Dad


We went up the mountain where
My dad hunted when he was little.
It was cold, the wind
Whipping up the holler, trees shaking.
Me and Daddy went to the top of the mountain.
We sat down and waited and had
A silent talk.


*******
by Abrianna Berry, Macon Middle School




Honorable Mention:




Child of the Wind,

by Falecia Metcalf, N. Buncombe Middle School, Weaverville


Sing to me,
with a soft melody.
Talk to me,
as if to a child.
Comfort me,
as if I were yours,
because in my heart
I am.
Whisper to me,
with words of joy.
I belong right here,
spinning around and around.
Guide me,
with a helping hand.
Lead me,
for without that
I'd be lost forever.
Stop me,
and make me think clearly.
I've always felt this way
no way to make it stop.
Not always in this place,
but always remembering
that special feeling
of belonging
I'm always look for.
Cradle me;
I'm yours,
a child of the Wind



I FEEL THE SEASONS (Mount Jefferson)


I feel the winter coldness on my face,
the trees that cover me are all frozen
My nose is frozen.
The air is windy

The snow is all around me.

I feel the spring breeze through my hair,

From the bottom up I'm green all over.

Animals waking everywhere,
Flowers swaying along with the wind,
Flowers all around me.

I feel the summer sun on my shoulders,

People climbing to my peak.

The fiery warmth touches me day and night,

Picnics on my tree covered skirt,

Fireflies all around me.
I feel the chill through my ruffled coat,

As time changes, days get shorter.

Leaves are falling through the brisk air,

The temperature is dropping down low,
Bright Colors all around me.



Addie Fairchild
6th grade, Westwood Elementary
Jefferson, NC

Friday, June 11, 2010

STUDENT POET OF THE DAY:ROBERTO RUBIO-OJEDA


Everyone knows about the Geico Gecko, but what about this Gecko? Seven year-old Roberto Rubio-Ojeda introduces his friend in the poem below. This piece shows us the fun of rhyming, something that children of all ages enjoy.


THE GECKO

A Gecko is sticky,
It can climb on a wall.
It can't stay forever.
Sooner or later it will fall.

A gecko's color is bright shiny green.
What if it was dark green?
Perhaps it would be mean!

A Gecko can't fly
Into the sky.
It if was sick and it was my pet,
I would take it to a vet.

A Gecko is big.
But not like a pig.
The Gecko is long,
But it's not very strong.

We can go on a walk,
But he can't really talk.
I will defend my friend
To the very end!

by Roberto Rubio-Ojeda

Roberto is the son of Roberto Rubio Torres and Monica Ojeda. He is in the second grade at Cartoogechaye Elementary School in Franklin, North Carolina.

Wednesday, June 9, 2010

STUDENT POET OF THE DAY: KYLIE COX


(Cloud watching from an airplane window)

Kylie Cox, a 3rd grader at Blue Ridge School in Cashiers, NC, obviously likes watching clouds, as do I. I confess that I've never seen a cloud monkey, but that's likely because my imagination isn't as lively as Kylie's!

CLOUD MONKEY

High in the sky
so high, so high
I see a monkey
skate boarding in the sky.

I see the monkey
flipping, tripping,
turning, and limping
as the clouds pass
by.

---Kylie Cox
Blue Ridge School


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

POET OF THE DAY: ABRIANNA BERRY


Last fall the Great Smoky Mountains Bookfair sponsored a Poetry Contest for K-12 students in Macon, Haywood, Jackson, and Swain Counties. The winners were posted on my NC Laureate blog in November. Going through the rest of the poems submitted, I was struck by how many were just plain good, worthy of being enjoyed by readers of this blog. For the next two weeks I will be featuring one of these young poets daily. Each one will receive a small "thank you" from me. Please stop by everyday to read their work.

This first poem is by Abrianna Berry, who lives in Franklin, NC, and is in the sixth grade at Macon Middle School.

Squirrel Hunting With My Dad

We went up the mountain where
My dad hunted when he was little.
It was cold the wind
Whipping up the holler, trees shaking.
Me and Daddy went to the top of the mountain.
We sat down and waited and had
A silent talk.

*******
by Abrianna Berry,
daughter of Mark and Stephanie Berry
Franklin, North Carolina

Someone teaching in the 6th grade at Macon Middle School is doing a wonderful job encouraging students to write from their most cherished experiences. This young poet presents a moving and thoroughly believable scene; the wind whipping up the holler uses sound to make us feel the effects of the cold and the climb to the top of the mountain. The "silent talk" shows a depth and maturity beyond a sixth grader's years. Abrianna is already a poet, and I hope she continues to read poetry and to write it.

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

A Poem a Day. Why not try it?



I was just browsing the website of Osondu Booksellers in Waynesville, one of my favorite Indie Bookstores, second only to City Lights Books in Sylva, owned and run by my good friend Joyce Moore, and found the results of this poll, asking which book group would you be most interested in joining.

Mystery---7.36.8%
Local History---7 .36.8%
Poetry---5 .26.3%

Well, it's true only 19 people responded, and even 5 percent wanting a poetry book group is encouraging. But the next poll asked which book genre would you like to see Osondu's expanding and poetry was not even on the list! It's time for that to change. Because, in case you haven't heard, "change" is the word these days.

So, here is my suggestion during this wintry weather, and beyond: Go ask your bookseller or a friend who reads and/or writes poems to recommend a good book of poetry, and every afternoon when the holiday stress is getting to you, sit down with a cup of tea, or a glass of wine, and read one poem from that book.

Just one.

That's all you have to do. Read it slowly as you sip your beverage, take deep breaths as Dr. Weil urges us to do, and simply let the language steep in your mind as your tea has steeped in the hot water.

I know, I know, we all love to get hooked by so-called "page-turners." Oh, I couldn't wait to find out who did this or said that! Well, poetry asks you to wait. And this time of year, we'd all feel calmer if we slowed down and read just one poem slowly and gratefully. As for the tea--right now I'm sipping Afternoon Darjeeling, with milk and just a tad of brown sugar. It's delicious. The poem that's waiting for me? Maybe one by several of my favorite poets---Nancy Simpson, Cecilia Woloch, William Wordsworth, Bill Brown, Seamus Heaney, doris davenport, and on into poetic infinity.

I'll join you there. We'll share a cup of tea and a book of poetry together.