Welcome to where I am, where my kitchen's always messy, a pot's (or a poet) always about to boil over, a dog is always begging to be fed. Drafts of poems on the counter. Windows filled with leaves. Wind. Clouds moving over the mountains. If you like poetry, books, and music--especially dog howls when a siren unwinds down the hill-- you'll like it here.


MY NEW AUTHOR'S SITE, KATHRYNSTRIPLINGBYER.COM, THAT I MYSELF SET UP THROUGH WEEBLY.COM, IS NOW UP. I HAD FUN CREATING THIS SITE AND WOULD RECOMMEND WEEBLY.COM TO ANYONE INTERESTED IN SETTING UP A WEBSITE. I INVITE YOU TO VISIT MY NEW SITE TO KEEP UP WITH EVENTS RELATED TO MY NEW BOOK.


MY NC POET LAUREATE BLOG, MY LAUREATE'S LASSO, WILL REMAIN UP AS AN ARCHIVE OF NC POETS, GRADES K-INFINITY! I INVITE YOU TO VISIT WHEN YOU FEEL THE NEED TO READ SOME GOOD POEMS.

VISIT MY NEW BLOG, MOUNTAIN WOMAN, WHERE YOU WILL FIND UPDATES ON WHAT'S HAPPENING IN MY KITCHEN, IN THE ENVIRONMENT, IN MY IMAGINATION, IN MY GARDEN, AND AMONG MY MOUNTAIN WOMEN FRIENDS.




Saturday, June 13, 2009

Up Close and Personal, Too

After looking at my friend Vicki Lane's post, I decided to go outside and find something to get up close to. One Asian lily was blooming, so--yes, I decided I wanted to be up close to that. Here she is, with a few raindrops shining on her raiment.



And as I was walking out to the garden, I disturbed this little guy. He is giving me a not so friendly look. I hope he made it safely into the foliage and away from our dogs.



Here's a poem by Jeffery Beam, Poet of the Week on my Laureate Blog.
I hope you will visit it and read all of his poems posted there.


Credo

Now, when I talk
it is not just to say
this or
that.
But it is to say
what is between.

Over there,
under the sycamore, runs
the argumentative
periwinkle.
The blue eye
of southern spring.

Over there,
chickadee whistle
& blue
bird.

Here swings
the blues’
rightful cadence.
Words’ melancholic
swarm, thick with
dribble, &
slang.

To my own self
be true.

To say what is
between:
the periwinkle,
the chickadee.

Originally published in the Asheville Poetry Review 10th anniversary anthology issue, 2004.

6 comments:

Vicki Lane said...

Saying what is between this and that -- a lovely thought. I remember in my painting class being introduced to the concept of negative space -- the visual equivalent.

Beautiful lily -- the slugs have turned most of mine to slimy lace.

Glenda C. Beall said...

Great photos, Kay. I like the turtle.
I have a question about this poem. He uses some multi-sylabic words and I've heard poetry instructors say it is best to use one or two syllable words. In fact, one night at our critique group, my cornucopia had to go. What are your thoughts on this subject?

Kathryn Stripling Byer said...

Hi Vicki and Glenda, the concept of negative space is fascinating. I wish I could do visual art again--guess I could, but when?
Glenda, I don't hold with rules like the one in your poetry group. If you limit yourself to one or two syllable words, you will be impoverished as a writer. Bring your cornucopia back into your poem. I've used that word in a poem; I love it. It's one of my favorite words. The important thing is to use each word well. Retrieve cornucopia!

Glenda C. Beall said...

Thank you, Kay. I loved my cornucopia and I really never let it go, but I never felt really good about it again. Thanks for your permission. Now, I can bring it out of hiding.

My Carolina Kitchen said...

Vicki's photos and her garden are incredible. She's a talented photographer. Your lily is gorgeous. That is an incredible turtle. His back looks like an ancient language. You both have inspired me to take some pictures of my herb garden.
Sam

Kathryn Stripling Byer said...

Sam, I love your comment about the turtle's back looking like an ancient langauge! I may have to "steal" that image. Yes, you should make photos of your herb garden. I would like to see them.
Which reminds me that I need to thin our basil today!